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Definitions of Resiliency Terms

A Gospel Lens Look at Resiliency for Ministry

Dr. Penny Nelson Freeman © Parakaleo

Definition of terms:

Resilience: a descriptive term for a person’s ability to adapt or recover after a season of difficulty. It assumes that life stressors will cause one to lose balance or shape.

A resilient person will generally regain and improve his or her ability to cope during or after a season of recovery, and learn to incorporate new gospel lessons for future use. Resiliency doesn’t mean people not affected by difficulty, pain, suffering or stress, but that their gospel agility grows and their flexibility to stressors reflects an ongoing desire to embrace and practice gospel truths as necessary.

Burnout: “...a state of physical, emotional and mental exhaustion caused by excessive long-term involvement in an emotionally draining situation. It is a gradual process and the symptoms include: inability to concentrate, irritability, pessimism, sleep problems, and feelings of apathy.” (D. Langberg, Suffering and the Heart of God: How Trauma Destroys and Christ Restores, p 318).

       ●  Things that used to bring you joy now feel like drudgery.

       ●  You begin to avoid the things you once felt energized you.

Compassion Fatigue: Accumulated weariness from the daily work of entering the sorrow and attending to the human condition with a compassionate response.

“You cannot do the work that you do, under the circumstances in which you live and not at least sometimes get emotionally overwhelmed” (J.Herman).) “Exposure to human suffering challenges our emotional balance" (Langberg, p. 318). Symptoms include feeling overwhelmed, crying, raging, anxiety, emotional shutdown or numbness, disconnecting from loved ones, feelings of helplessness, and lowering of morale.

Secondary Distress: The cumulative effect of compassion fatigue and exposure to multiple details of distressing stories and facts over time may cause caregivers to have the same emotions, thoughts, memories, and physical responses as those they are helping, even if they are currently in a personal season of well-being. Being overly distressed by exposure to other's distress and trauma symptoms will include: feeling on guard, flashbacks of specific memories not your own, startle response, nightmares, mood swings, sleep difficulties, concentration difficulties.

 

A Gospel Lens Look at Resiliency for Ministry

Dr. Penny Nelson Freeman © Parakaleo

Definition of terms:

Resilience: a descriptive term for a person’s ability to adapt or recover after a season of difficulty. It assumes that life stressors will cause one to lose balance or shape.

A resilient person will generally regain and improve his or her ability to cope during or after a season of recovery, and learn to incorporate new gospel lessons for future use. Resiliency doesn’t mean people not affected by difficulty, pain, suffering or stress, but that their gospel agility grows and their flexibility to stressors reflects an ongoing desire to embrace and practice gospel truths as necessary.

Burnout: “...a state of physical, emotional and mental exhaustion caused by excessive long-term involvement in an emotionally draining situation. It is a gradual process and the symptoms include: inability to concentrate, irritability, pessimism, sleep problems, and feelings of apathy.” (D. Langberg, Suffering and the Heart of God: How Trauma Destroys and Christ Restores, p 318).

            ●  Things that used to bring you joy now feel like drudgery.

            ●  You begin to avoid the things you once felt energized you.

Compassion Fatigue: Accumulated weariness from the daily work of entering the sorrow and attending to the human condition with a compassionate response.

“You cannot do the work that you do, under the circumstances in which you live and not at least sometimes get emotionally overwhelmed” (J.Herman).) “Exposure to human suffering challenges our emotional balance" (Langberg, p. 318). Symptoms include feeling overwhelmed, crying, raging, anxiety, emotional shutdown or numbness, disconnecting from loved ones, feelings of helplessness, and lowering of morale.

Secondary Distress: The cumulative effect of compassion fatigue and exposure to multiple details of distressing stories and facts over time may cause caregivers to have the same emotions, thoughts, memories, and physical responses as those they are helping, even if they are currently in a personal season of well-being. Being overly distressed by exposure to other's distress and trauma symptoms will include: feeling on guard, flashbacks of specific memories not your own, startle response, nightmares, mood swings, sleep difficulties, concentration difficulties.